Black Clay New Mexico Pueblo Pitcher Cup

Black Clay New Mexico Pueblo Pitcher Cup

Black Clay New Mexico Pueblo Pitcher Cup

Black Clay New Mexico Pueblo Pitcher Cup

We purchased this small pitcher cup in the early 90s at an estate sale of a prominent, well traveled family who lived in Cincinnati along with another pitcher and a simple, similarly styled and fired black bowl. We believe it to be from the late 40s or early 50s purchased among other significant treasures from a trip west before their children were born and raised. The clay, glaze and firing are indicative of Pueblo pottery, particularly San Ildefonso, such as the black on black pottery made famous by the late Maria Martinez. While this piece exhibits less stylization, and unfortunately no signature, we believe it, and the other objects procured simultaneously, were made in the same era as Maria Martinez’s early work.

Measurements: 7″ tall, 3.5″ diameter, 5″ wide including handle

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Vintage 70s Blue and Rust Glazed Hand Thrown Ceramic Vase

blue and rust Vase

blue and rust Vase

blue and rust Vase base

The perfect size vessel to hold pencils, pens, or posies on your desk or table. Hand thrown, it was initialed by the artist, purchased at a summer art fair in the mid-west in the early 70s. It has an blue and rust colored glaze which is appropriate for the organic craft era in which it was made and purchased. Would be nice as a start to or and addition to collection of similar period work.

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Cedar Hill Farms Ceramic Crock Pottery

cedarHill logo

cedar Hill farms crock inside

cedar hill farms crock base

This vintage ceramic crock was manufactured and labeled for Cedar Hill Farms Dairy. The photos depict its vintage condition, with no chips or cracks, it has some discoloration from age and use. It was among family treasures and oddities from our mid-western upbringing. Although we are certain that Cedar Hill Farms was one of over 45 dairies local to southwestern Ohio, we are not aware of its original familial origin. The plural “Farms” suggests it is connected with the collective of local farmers who’s independent dairies milk was sold to and pasteurized under the name Cedar Hill Farms. The dairy went out of business decades ago. Today, the name Cedar Hill Farm is not uncommon, there is a popular farm in Misssissippi that hosts private and public events, another Cedar Hill Farm in North Carolina serves equestrian needs as stables and training for hunters and dressage horses , another in Wisconsin, … The name bears a certain nostalgia for a bucolic setting and time, regardless of origin.

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Vintage Bauer Pottery Ringware Nesting Bowls

Bauer Pottery Ringware Nesting Bowls
Bauer Pottery Ringware Nesting Bowl
Bauer Pottery Ringware Nesting Bowl
Bauer Pottery Ringware Nesting Bowl
baeur-b-8044
Three beehive or ringware nesting mixing bowls discovered among the contents of our Grandmother’s basement. In remarkable condition for how long they were initially used and then stored. Bauer pottery, an American pottery that was founded in Paducah, KY was moved to California in the early 1900s. Operations were closed in 1962 the result of a dispute related to labor. Here are three bowls, the largest of the three bowls is ( 9″ x 4.5″) a soft green marked BAUER USA on the bottom clean and in very good vintage condition. The medium ( 7.5″ x 4″) is a pretty periwinkle blue glaze with no crazing, or chips. There is one tiny glaze flaw on the inside; there since its original firing. It is marked BAUER USA, clearly under the original gloss glaze. The smallest of the three is an off white (7″ x 3.5″) unmarked. It has no chips, just light crazing in the glaze but nothing detracting.

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Yellow McCoy Pottery Ceramic Flower Vase

Yellow McCoy Pottery Ceramic Flower Vase

This pretty vintage McCoy vase is the perfect size and color for various posies from your garden. Or, it would be lovely gift for someone who has a cutting garden! We purchased it outside of Huntington, West Virginia during the late 80s. It is classically shaped with a leafy motif. The piece is in good vintage condition, the glaze shows no crazing, it has one small chip on the inside of the opening invisible when in use or turned toward the front during display. It is clean, with no discoloration inside from prior use. It has the McCoy maker’s mark on the bottom.

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Russel Wright “American Modern”

russel wright pottery
russel wright pottery
russel wright pottery
russel wright pottery
russel wright pottery
American artist and 20th century industrial designer Russel Wright’s (b. 1904- d.1976) earliest art training occurred under Frank Duveneck at the Art Academy of Cincinnati as a high school student. Initially destined for a legal career, he later attended Princeton University but left to pursue work under theatrical set designer Normal Bel Geddes, George Cukor, and others. In 1927, he began his own design firm specializing in theatrical props in New York City.

Russel Wright became a licensed brand phenomenon before the concept was used broadly by more than a small group of manufacturers of consumer goods including G.E. or the automotive industry’s big three: Ford, Chrysler, G.M. Now, brands are also identified with other descriptions such as “awareness” and “image.” His trademarked signature appeared on all the various products associated with his name.

Russel Wright espoused that “good design is for everyone.” He was said to believe that the “table was the center of the home” and designed lifestyles with not only his ceramic and spun aluminum tableware but architectural, landscape, furniture and textile designs. His designs were not only practical but simple, as were his contemporaries’, during the design period which occurred during the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s known as Modernism.

Among his numerous collaborations to produce his designs, his relationship with Steubenville, an Ohio ceramics company, to produce his “American Modern” dinnerware is noteworthy. The design, produced between 1939 and 1959, is the most widely sold American ceramic dinnerware.

Wright later designed many popular lines including his work in Melmac, a melamine resin, and early plastics with various manufacturers. His “Residential” dinnerware line received the Museum of Modern Art “Good Design Award” in 1953.

His company, Russel Wright Studios, has offices in New York and California, as sole licensors of Wright’s industrial designs and products for corporate and public clients. Mention of the re-issue of pieces from the “American Modern” line now produced by Bauer Pottery, may be found in publications such as now defunct Bon Appetite, as well as Dwell, Metropolitan Home, and other lifestyle magazines.

Our collection consists of over 70 curvy, sleek pieces from the “American Modern” line which includes not only those photographed but other highly sought after examples in Granite Grey, Sea Foam Blue, and Coral colors.

Pieces from the collection we chose to photograph include 1) pitcher, celery tray, salt + pepper shakers 2) salad bowl, gravy server 3) lidded butter dish, divided vegetable 4) salt + pepper shakers, lidded sugar bowl, covered bowl 5) three demitasse cups sans saucers.

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Vintage Roseville Pottery Imperial 1 Console Bowl

roseville imperial1 bowl
roseville imperial 1 bowl
This large ceramic pottery bowl or low planter has a rich, warm earth tone feel. The Roseville Imperial Pattern 71 was introduced in 1921. Although the bottom is unmarked this is a well documented pattern. It is in excellent vintage condition, no chips, cracks or repairs. Imperial is a textured, relief modeled background, which looks like bark. It is glazed in semi-gloss with stylized knotted vine with a single green leaf, brown vine, and purple berries. Wonderful collectible piece for display or use as originally intended a low planter.

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Azure Blue Roseville Pottery Miniature 4″ Jardiniere with White Rose

Roseville vase
roseville vase
This beautiful vintage azure blue bowl is marked Roseville USA 653- 4″. This design was discontinued circa 1940. It has very good color, glaze work and relief, having been made with a “super mold.” The background color and white rose blossoms convey a serene romanticism. The piece is in good vintage condition, with no repairs, only a small hairline crack and a rusty ring of discoloration on the inside toward bottom.

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